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Resources tagged with Investigations similar to Chain of Changes:

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Broad Topics > Using, Applying and Reasoning about Mathematics > Investigations

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2 Rings

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

The red ring is inside the blue ring in this picture. Can you rearrange the rings in different ways? Perhaps you can overlap them or put one outside another?

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Olympic Rings

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

This problem is intended to get children to look really hard at something they will see many times in the next few months.

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Colouring Triangles

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Explore ways of colouring this set of triangles. Can you make symmetrical patterns?

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Halving

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

These pictures show squares split into halves. Can you find other ways?

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Count the Digits

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

In this investigation we are going to count the number of 1s, 2s, 3s etc in numbers. Can you predict what will happen?

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Lawn Border

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

If I use 12 green tiles to represent my lawn, how many different ways could I arrange them? How many border tiles would I need each time?

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Shaping It

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

These pictures were made by starting with a square, finding the half-way point on each side and joining those points up. You could investigate your own starting shape.

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Calendar Patterns

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

In this section from a calendar, put a square box around the 1st, 2nd, 8th and 9th. Add all the pairs of numbers. What do you notice about the answers?

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Triangular Hexagons

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Investigate these hexagons drawn from different sized equilateral triangles.

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Triangle Shapes

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

This practical problem challenges you to create shapes and patterns with two different types of triangle. You could even try overlapping them.

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Are You a Smart Shopper?

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

In my local town there are three supermarkets which each has a special deal on some products. If you bought all your shopping in one shop, where would be the cheapest?

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Escher Tessellations

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

This practical investigation invites you to make tessellating shapes in a similar way to the artist Escher.

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Tessellating Triangles

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Can you make these equilateral triangles fit together to cover the paper without any gaps between them? Can you tessellate isosceles triangles?

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Extending Great Squares

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Explore one of these five pictures.

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Exploring Wild & Wonderful Number Patterns

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

EWWNP means Exploring Wild and Wonderful Number Patterns Created by Yourself! Investigate what happens if we create number patterns using some simple rules.

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Cutting Corners

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Can you make the most extraordinary, the most amazing, the most unusual patterns/designs from these triangles which are made in a special way?

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Opening Out

Age 5 to 11

Bernard Bagnall describes how to get more out of some favourite NRICH investigations.

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Eye View

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Why does the tower look a different size in each of these pictures?

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Seven Sticks

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Explore the triangles that can be made with seven sticks of the same length.

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So It's 28

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Here is your chance to investigate the number 28 using shapes, cubes ... in fact anything at all.

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Tessellating Transformations

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Can you find out how the 6-triangle shape is transformed in these tessellations? Will the tessellations go on for ever? Why or why not?

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Sending and Receiving Cards

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

This challenge asks you to investigate the total number of cards that would be sent if four children send one to all three others. How many would be sent if there were five children? Six?

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Exploring Number Patterns You Make

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Explore Alex's number plumber. What questions would you like to ask? What do you think is happening to the numbers?

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Street Sequences

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

Investigate what happens when you add house numbers along a street in different ways.

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Baked Bean Cans

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Is there a best way to stack cans? What do different supermarkets do? How high can you safely stack the cans?

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Taking a Die for a Walk

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

Investigate the numbers that come up on a die as you roll it in the direction of north, south, east and west, without going over the path it's already made.

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Repeating Patterns

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Try continuing these patterns made from triangles. Can you create your own repeating pattern?

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Marvellous Matrix

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Follow the directions for circling numbers in the matrix. Add all the circled numbers together. Note your answer. Try again with a different starting number. What do you notice?

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Two by One

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

An activity making various patterns with 2 x 1 rectangular tiles.

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It's All about 64

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Write the numbers up to 64 in an interesting way so that the shape they make at the end is interesting, different, more exciting ... than just a square.

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It Must Be 2000

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Here are many ideas for you to investigate - all linked with the number 2000.

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The Big Cheese

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Investigate the area of 'slices' cut off this cube of cheese. What would happen if you had different-sized block of cheese to start with?

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Experiencing Problem Solving

Age 5 to 11

Bernard Bagnall looks at what 'problem solving' might really mean in the context of primary classrooms.

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Bean Bags for Bernard's Bag

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

How could you put eight beanbags in the hoops so that there are four in the blue hoop, five in the red and six in the yellow? Can you find all the ways of doing this?

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Magic Constants

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

In a Magic Square all the rows, columns and diagonals add to the 'Magic Constant'. How would you change the magic constant of this square?

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Follow the Numbers

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

What happens when you add the digits of a number then multiply the result by 2 and you keep doing this? You could try for different numbers and different rules.

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My New Patio

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

What is the smallest number of tiles needed to tile this patio? Can you investigate patios of different sizes?

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Fit These Shapes

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

What is the largest number of circles we can fit into the frame without them overlapping? How do you know? What will happen if you try the other shapes?

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Fencing

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Arrange your fences to make the largest rectangular space you can. Try with four fences, then five, then six etc.

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Double Your Popcorn, Double Your Pleasure

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

We went to the cinema and decided to buy some bags of popcorn so we asked about the prices. Investigate how much popcorn each bag holds so find out which we might have bought.

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Triangle Relations

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

What do these two triangles have in common? How are they related?

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Let's Investigate Triangles

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Vincent and Tara are making triangles with the class construction set. They have a pile of strips of different lengths. How many different triangles can they make?

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Cutting it Out

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

I cut this square into two different shapes. What can you say about the relationship between them?

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Abundant Numbers

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

48 is called an abundant number because it is less than the sum of its factors (without itself). Can you find some more abundant numbers?

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The Pied Piper of Hamelin

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

This problem is based on the story of the Pied Piper of Hamelin. Investigate the different numbers of people and rats there could have been if you know how many legs there are altogether!

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Sticks and Triangles

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Using different numbers of sticks, how many different triangles are you able to make? Can you make any rules about the numbers of sticks that make the most triangles?

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Mobile Numbers

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

In this investigation, you are challenged to make mobile phone numbers which are easy to remember. What happens if you make a sequence adding 2 each time?

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Pebbles

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Place four pebbles on the sand in the form of a square. Keep adding as few pebbles as necessary to double the area. How many extra pebbles are added each time?

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Sorting the Numbers

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

Complete these two jigsaws then put one on top of the other. What happens when you add the 'touching' numbers? What happens when you change the position of the jigsaws?

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It's a Fence!

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

In this challenge, you will work in a group to investigate circular fences enclosing trees that are planted in square or triangular arrangements.