Being Curious - Lower Primary

Being Curious - Lower Primary is part of our Being a Good Thinker - Lower Primary collection.

Good thinkers are curious and ask good questions. They are excited by new ideas and are keen to explore and investigate them. 

How can you become a more curious mathematician?

These problems will exploit your natural curiosity and encourage you to ask good mathematical questions.

You can browse through the Number, Measures, Geometry or Statistics collections, or scroll down to see the full set of problems below.

Age 5 to 7

Being Curious - Lower Primary Number

Number problems to spark your curiosity.

Age 5 to 7

Being Curious - Lower Primary Measures

Measure problems to spark your curiosity.

Age 5 to 7

Being Curious - Lower Primary Geometry

Geometry problems to spark your curiosity.

Age 5 to 7

Being Curious - Lower Primary Statistics

Statistics problems to spark your curiosity.

Five Steps to 50

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Use five steps to count forwards or backwards in 1s or 10s to get to 50. What strategies did you use?

Robot Monsters

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Use these head, body and leg pieces to make Robot Monsters which are different heights.

Repeating Patterns

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Try continuing these patterns made from triangles. Can you create your own repeating pattern?

Chain of Changes

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Arrange the shapes in a line so that you change either colour or shape in the next piece along. Can you find several ways to start with a blue triangle and end with a red circle?

Eggs in Baskets

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

There are three baskets, a brown one, a red one and a pink one, holding a total of 10 eggs. How many eggs are in each basket?

Little Man

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

The Man is much smaller than us. Can you use the picture of him next to a mug to estimate his height and how much tea he drinks?

Mixed-up Socks

Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Start with three pairs of socks. Now mix them up so that no mismatched pair is the same as another mismatched pair. Is there more than one way to do it?

If the World Were a Village

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

This activity is based on data in the book 'If the World Were a Village'. How will you represent your chosen data for maximum effect?