You may also like

problem icon

Temperature

Water freezes at 0°Celsius (32°Fahrenheit) and boils at 100°C (212°Fahrenheit). Is there a temperature at which Celsius and Fahrenheit readings are the same?

problem icon

Mixing Lemonade

Can you work out which drink has the stronger flavour?

problem icon

Does This Sound about Right?

Examine these estimates. Do they sound about right?

Place Your Orders

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

 

Have a look at the sets of four quantities below. Can you rank them in order from smallest to largest?

To help you to decide on your rankings, you may need to find extra information or carry out some experiments.

Can you provide convincing evidence of your final rankings?
 

Time
 
For light to reach us from the nearest star other than the sun
That a pet rat lives
Between two football world cups
For all of the red blood cells in your body to be replaced....10 times
Distance
 
You can hop in 5 seconds
A car can drive on $1$cm$^3$ of fuel
From the top of a 6 storey building to the ground
The distance from the penalty spot to the goal on a football field
Speed
 
Of a racehorse running at maximum speed
Of the fastest sprinter in the world
Of the fastest cyclist in an Olympic cycle sprint race
Of a bus going past the school
Mass 
 
Of a standard family car
Of a million cubic centimetres of water
Of a team of international male rugby players (15 players)
Of enough potatoes to make chips to feed everyone in the school for a week.
Volume of water
 
In a half-filled bath
Used in a 10 minute shower
Used in 5 dishwasher cycles
Used to flush the toilet 20 times
 
Number of
 
Mars bars with the same total weight as your whole class
Steps when walking at a leisurely pace for 1 hour
Stitches in a handknitted jumper
People at a cup final in a large stadium
 
Area 
 
Of the sheets of paper in a ream (500 sheets) of A4.
Of the floor of the classroom
Covered by 5 litres of paint
Of fabric needed to make school uniforms for the whole class.

 
Perhaps you might like to make 4 ranked quantities of your own to challenge a friend.
 
For more advanced science, see Approximately Certain