Clock Arithmetic and Number Theory - November 2003, Stage 4&5

Problems

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Excel Investigation: the Difference of Two (same) Powers

Age 11 to 16 Challenge Level:

If you take two integers and look at the difference between the square of each value, there is a nice relationship between the original numbers and that difference. Can you find the pattern using. . . .

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Transposition Fix

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Suppose an operator types a US Bank check code into a machine and transposes two adjacent digits will the machine pick up every error of this type? Does the same apply to ISBN numbers; will a machine. . . .

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Check Code Sensitivity

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

You are given the method used for assigning certain check codes and you have to find out if an error in a single digit can be identified.

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Check Codes

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Details are given of how check codes are constructed (using modulus arithmetic for passports, bank accounts, credit cards, ISBN book numbers, and so on. A list of codes is given and you have to check. . . .

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Composite Notions

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

A composite number is one that is neither prime nor 1. Show that 10201 is composite in any base.

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Modular Fractions

Age 16 to 18 Challenge Level:

We only need 7 numbers for modulus (or clock) arithmetic mod 7 including working with fractions. Explore how to divide numbers and write fractions in modulus arithemtic.