Resources tagged with: Squares

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Broad Topics > Angles, Polygons, and Geometrical Proof > Squares

LOGO Challenge 7 - More Stars and Squares

Age 11 to 16 Challenge Level:

Can you use LOGO to create a systematic reproduction of a basic design? An introduction to variables in a familiar setting.

Logo Challenge 3 - Star Square

Age 7 to 16 Challenge Level:

Creating designs with squares - using the REPEAT command in LOGO. This requires some careful thought on angles

LOGO Challenge 4 - Squares to Procedures

Age 11 to 16 Challenge Level:

This LOGO Challenge emphasises the idea of breaking down a problem into smaller manageable parts. Working on squares and angles.

First Forward Into Logo 1: Square Five

Age 7 to 16 Challenge Level:

A Short introduction to using Logo. This is the first in a twelve part series.

LOGO Challenge - the Humble Square

Age 7 to 16 Challenge Level:

Look at how the pattern is built up - in that way you will know how to break the final pattern down into more manageable pieces.

LOGO Challenge 5 - Patch

Age 11 to 16 Challenge Level:

Using LOGO, can you construct elegant procedures that will draw this family of 'floor coverings'?

Square Areas

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Can you work out the area of the inner square and give an explanation of how you did it?

LOGO Challenge - the Logic of LOGO

Age 11 to 16 Challenge Level:

Just four procedures were used to produce a design. How was it done? Can you be systematic and elegant so that someone can follow your logic?

Opposite Vertices

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Can you recreate squares and rhombuses if you are only given a side or a diagonal?

Similarly So

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

ABCD is a square. P is the midpoint of AB and is joined to C. A line from D perpendicular to PC meets the line at the point Q. Prove AQ = AD.

Semi-detached

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

A square of area 40 square cms is inscribed in a semicircle. Find the area of the square that could be inscribed in a circle of the same radius.

Take a Square

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Cut off three right angled isosceles triangles to produce a pentagon. With two lines, cut the pentagon into three parts which can be rearranged into another square.

Hidden Squares

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Can you find the squares hidden on these coordinate grids?

2001 Spatial Oddity

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

With one cut a piece of card 16 cm by 9 cm can be made into two pieces which can be rearranged to form a square 12 cm by 12 cm. Explain how this can be done.

Circle Box

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

It is obvious that we can fit four circles of diameter 1 unit in a square of side 2 without overlapping. What is the smallest square into which we can fit 3 circles of diameter 1 unit?

Squaring the Circle and Circling the Square

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

If you continue the pattern, can you predict what each of the following areas will be? Try to explain your prediction.

Zig Zag

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Four identical right angled triangles are drawn on the sides of a square. Two face out, two face in. Why do the four vertices marked with dots lie on one line?

Fitting In

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

The largest square which fits into a circle is ABCD and EFGH is a square with G and H on the line CD and E and F on the circumference of the circle. Show that AB = 5EF. Similarly the largest. . . .

Square Within a Square Within...

Age 11 to 14 Short Challenge Level:

What fraction of this square is shaded?

Two Triangles in a Square

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Given that ABCD is a square, M is the mid point of AD and CP is perpendicular to MB with P on MB, prove DP = DC.

Folding Fractions

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

What fractions can you divide the diagonal of a square into by simple folding?

Folding Squares

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

The diagonal of a square intersects the line joining one of the unused corners to the midpoint of the opposite side. What do you notice about the line segments produced?

Tetra Square

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

ABCD is a regular tetrahedron and the points P, Q, R and S are the midpoints of the edges AB, BD, CD and CA. Prove that PQRS is a square.

Squares in Rectangles

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

A 2 by 3 rectangle contains 8 squares and a 3 by 4 rectangle contains 20 squares. What size rectangle(s) contain(s) exactly 100 squares? Can you find them all?

Dissect

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

What is the minimum number of squares a 13 by 13 square can be dissected into?

Pinned Squares

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

What is the total number of squares that can be made on a 5 by 5 geoboard?

Baravelle

Age 7 to 16 Challenge Level:

What can you see? What do you notice? What questions can you ask?

Eight Hidden Squares

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

On the graph there are 28 marked points. These points all mark the vertices (corners) of eight hidden squares. Can you find the eight hidden squares?

Coloured Edges

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

The whole set of tiles is used to make a square. This has a green and blue border. There are no green or blue tiles anywhere in the square except on this border. How many tiles are there in the set?

Squares, Squares and More Squares

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Can you dissect a square into: 4, 7, 10, 13... other squares? 6, 9, 12, 15... other squares? 8, 11, 14... other squares?

Square Coordinates

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

A tilted square is a square with no horizontal sides. Can you devise a general instruction for the construction of a square when you are given just one of its sides?

Something in Common

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

A square of area 3 square units cannot be drawn on a 2D grid so that each of its vertices have integer coordinates, but can it be drawn on a 3D grid? Investigate squares that can be drawn.

Square It

Age 11 to 16 Challenge Level:

Players take it in turns to choose a dot on the grid. The winner is the first to have four dots that can be joined to form a square.

On the Edge

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

If you move the tiles around, can you make squares with different coloured edges?

Just Opposite

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

A and C are the opposite vertices of a square ABCD, and have coordinates (a,b) and (c,d), respectively. What are the coordinates of the vertices B and D? What is the area of the square?

Zooming in on the Squares

Age 7 to 14

Start with a large square, join the midpoints of its sides, you'll see four right angled triangles. Remove these triangles, a second square is left. Repeat the operation. What happens?

A Tilted Square

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

The opposite vertices of a square have coordinates (a,b) and (c,d). What are the coordinates of the other vertices?

Ten Hidden Squares

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

These points all mark the vertices (corners) of ten hidden squares. Can you find the 10 hidden squares?

Vector Journeys

Age 14 to 18 Challenge Level:

Charlie likes to go for walks around a square park, while Alison likes to cut across diagonally. Can you find relationships between the vectors they walk along?