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Resources tagged with Describing Sequences similar to Differences:

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Broad Topics > Patterns, Sequences and Structure > Describing Sequences

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Shifting Times Tables

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Can you find a way to identify times tables after they have been shifted up or down?

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Maxagon

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

What's the greatest number of sides a polygon on a dotty grid could have?

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Seven Squares - Group-worthy Task

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Choose a couple of the sequences. Try to picture how to make the next, and the next, and the next... Can you describe your reasoning?

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1 Step 2 Step

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Liam's house has a staircase with 12 steps. He can go down the steps one at a time or two at time. In how many different ways can Liam go down the 12 steps?

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Seven Squares

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Watch these videos to see how Phoebe, Alice and Luke chose to draw 7 squares. How would they draw 100?

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Pocket Money

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Which of these pocket money systems would you rather have?

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Odds, Evens and More Evens

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Alison, Bernard and Charlie have been exploring sequences of odd and even numbers, which raise some intriguing questions...

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Paving Paths

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

How many different ways can I lay 10 paving slabs, each 2 foot by 1 foot, to make a path 2 foot wide and 10 foot long from my back door into my garden, without cutting any of the paving slabs?

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Farey Sequences

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

There are lots of ideas to explore in these sequences of ordered fractions.

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Changing Places

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Place a red counter in the top left corner of a 4x4 array, which is covered by 14 other smaller counters, leaving a gap in the bottom right hand corner (HOME). What is the smallest number of moves. . . .