Search by Topic

Resources tagged with Sine, cosine, tangent similar to History of Trigonometry - Part 3:

Filter by: Content type:
Age range:
Challenge level:

There are 37 results

Broad Topics > Pythagoras and Trigonometry > Sine, cosine, tangent

problem icon

History of Trigonometry - Part 3

Age 11 to 18

The third of three articles on the History of Trigonometry.

problem icon

Swings and Roundabouts

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

If you were to set the X weight to 2 what do you think the angle might be?

problem icon

Sine and Cosine for Connected Angles

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

The length AM can be calculated using trigonometry in two different ways. Create this pair of equivalent calculations for different peg boards, notice a general result, and account for it.

problem icon

The History of Trigonometry- Part 1

Age 11 to 18

The first of three articles on the History of Trigonometry. This takes us from the Egyptians to early work on trigonometry in China.

problem icon

Round and Round a Circle

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Can you explain what is happening and account for the values being displayed?

problem icon

History of Trigonometry - Part 2

Age 11 to 18

The second of three articles on the History of Trigonometry.

problem icon

Farhan's Poor Square

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

From the measurements and the clue given find the area of the square that is not covered by the triangle and the circle.

problem icon

Dodecawhat

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Follow instructions to fold sheets of A4 paper into pentagons and assemble them to form a dodecahedron. Calculate the error in the angle of the not perfectly regular pentagons you make.

problem icon

Raising the Roof

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

How far should the roof overhang to shade windows from the mid-day sun?

problem icon

Where Is the Dot?

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

A dot starts at the point (1,0) and turns anticlockwise. Can you estimate the height of the dot after it has turned through 45 degrees? Can you calculate its height?

problem icon

Inscribed in a Circle

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

The area of a square inscribed in a circle with a unit radius is, satisfyingly, 2. What is the area of a regular hexagon inscribed in a circle with a unit radius?

problem icon

Circle Scaling

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Describe how to construct three circles which have areas in the ratio 1:2:3.

problem icon

Squ-areas

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Three squares are drawn on the sides of a triangle ABC. Their areas are respectively 18 000, 20 000 and 26 000 square centimetres. If the outer vertices of the squares are joined, three more. . . .

problem icon

Circumnavigation

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

The sides of a triangle are 25, 39 and 40 units of length. Find the diameter of the circumscribed circle.

problem icon

Sine and Cosine

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

The sine of an angle is equal to the cosine of its complement. Can you explain why and does this rule extend beyond angles of 90 degrees?

problem icon

Six Discs

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Six circular discs are packed in different-shaped boxes so that the discs touch their neighbours and the sides of the box. Can you put the boxes in order according to the areas of their bases?

problem icon

Figure of Eight

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

On a nine-point pegboard a band is stretched over 4 pegs in a "figure of 8" arrangement. How many different "figure of 8" arrangements can be made ?

problem icon

Moving Squares

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

How can you represent the curvature of a cylinder on a flat piece of paper?

problem icon

A Scale for the Solar System

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

The Earth is further from the Sun than Venus, but how much further? Twice as far? Ten times?

problem icon

Screen Shot

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

A moveable screen slides along a mirrored corridor towards a centrally placed light source. A ray of light from that source is directed towards a wall of the corridor, which it strikes at 45 degrees. . . .

problem icon

Trigonometric Protractor

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

An environment that simulates a protractor carrying a right- angled triangle of unit hypotenuse.

problem icon

Doesn't Add Up

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

In this problem we are faced with an apparently easy area problem, but it has gone horribly wrong! What happened?

problem icon

Muggles, Logo and Gradients

Age 11 to 18

Logo helps us to understand gradients of lines and why Muggles Magic is not magic but mathematics. See the problem Muggles magic.

problem icon

At a Glance

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

The area of a regular pentagon looks about twice as a big as the pentangle star drawn within it. Is it?

problem icon

Lying and Cheating

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Follow the instructions and you can take a rectangle, cut it into 4 pieces, discard two small triangles, put together the remaining two pieces and end up with a rectangle the same size. Try it!

problem icon

From All Corners

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Straight lines are drawn from each corner of a square to the mid points of the opposite sides. Express the area of the octagon that is formed at the centre as a fraction of the area of the square.

problem icon

8 Methods for Three by One

Age 14 to 18 Challenge Level:

This problem in geometry has been solved in no less than EIGHT ways by a pair of students. How would you solve it? How many of their solutions can you follow? How are they the same or different?. . . .

problem icon

Far Horizon

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

An observer is on top of a lighthouse. How far from the foot of the lighthouse is the horizon that the observer can see?

problem icon

Coke Machine

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

The coke machine in college takes 50 pence pieces. It also takes a certain foreign coin of traditional design...

problem icon

Orbiting Billiard Balls

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

What angle is needed for a ball to do a circuit of the billiard table and then pass through its original position?

problem icon

Eight Ratios

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Two perpendicular lines lie across each other and the end points are joined to form a quadrilateral. Eight ratios are defined, three are given but five need to be found.

problem icon

Making Maths: Clinometer

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Make a clinometer and use it to help you estimate the heights of tall objects.

problem icon

Circle Box

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

It is obvious that we can fit four circles of diameter 1 unit in a square of side 2 without overlapping. What is the smallest square into which we can fit 3 circles of diameter 1 unit?

problem icon

Round and Round

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Prove that the shaded area of the semicircle is equal to the area of the inner circle.

problem icon

Stadium Sightline

Age 14 to 18 Challenge Level:

How would you design the tiering of seats in a stadium so that all spectators have a good view?

problem icon

Cosines Rule

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Three points A, B and C lie in this order on a line, and P is any point in the plane. Use the Cosine Rule to prove the following statement.

problem icon

Muggles Magic

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

You can move the 4 pieces of the jigsaw and fit them into both outlines. Explain what has happened to the missing one unit of area.