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Resources tagged with Area - triangles, quadrilaterals, compound shapes similar to Making Rectangles:

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There are 21 results

Broad Topics > Measuring and calculating with units > Area - triangles, quadrilaterals, compound shapes

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Completing Quadrilaterals

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

We started drawing some quadrilaterals - can you complete them?

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Growing Rectangles

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

What happens to the area and volume of 2D and 3D shapes when you enlarge them?

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Tilted Squares

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

It's easy to work out the areas of most squares that we meet, but what if they were tilted?

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Dotty Triangles

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Imagine an infinitely large sheet of square dotty paper on which you can draw triangles of any size you wish (providing each vertex is on a dot). What areas is it/is it not possible to draw?

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Rati-o

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Points P, Q, R and S each divide the sides AB, BC, CD and DA respectively in the ratio of 2 : 1. Join the points. What is the area of the parallelogram PQRS in relation to the original rectangle?

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Isometric Areas

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

We usually use squares to measure area, but what if we use triangles instead?

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Triangle Transformation

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

Start with a triangle. Can you cut it up to make a rectangle?

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Kissing Triangles

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Determine the total shaded area of the 'kissing triangles'.

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Pick's Theorem

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Polygons drawn on square dotty paper have dots on their perimeter (p) and often internal (i) ones as well. Find a relationship between p, i and the area of the polygons.

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Isosceles

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Prove that a triangle with sides of length 5, 5 and 6 has the same area as a triangle with sides of length 5, 5 and 8. Find other pairs of non-congruent isosceles triangles which have equal areas.

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Triangles in a Square

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

What are the possible areas of triangles drawn in a square?

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More Isometric Areas

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Isometric Areas explored areas of parallelograms in triangular units. Here we explore areas of triangles...

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Quadrilaterals in a Square

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

What's special about the area of quadrilaterals drawn in a square?

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Linkage

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Four rods, two of length a and two of length b, are linked to form a kite. The linkage is moveable so that the angles change. What is the maximum area of the kite?

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Triangle Island

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

You have pitched your tent (the red triangle) on an island. Can you move it to the position shown by the purple triangle making sure you obey the rules?

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Maths Filler

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Imagine different shaped vessels being filled. Can you work out what the graphs of the water level should look like?

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Uncanny Triangles

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Can you help the children find the two triangles which have the lengths of two sides numerically equal to their areas?

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Overlap

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

A red square and a blue square overlap so that the corner of the red square rests on the centre of the blue square. Show that, whatever the orientation of the red square, it covers a quarter of the. . . .

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Disappearing Square

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Do you know how to find the area of a triangle? You can count the squares. What happens if we turn the triangle on end? Press the button and see. Try counting the number of units in the triangle now. . . .

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Shear Magic

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

What are the areas of these triangles? What do you notice? Can you generalise to other "families" of triangles?

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Isosceles Triangles

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

Draw some isosceles triangles with an area of $9$cm$^2$ and a vertex at (20,20). If all the vertices must have whole number coordinates, how many is it possible to draw?