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Resources tagged with Questioning similar to Become Maths Detectives:

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Broad Topics > Using, Applying and Reasoning about Mathematics > Questioning

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Become Maths Detectives

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Explore Alex's number plumber. What questions would you like to ask? Don't forget to keep visiting NRICH projects site for the latest developments and questions.

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Opening Out

Age 5 to 11

Bernard Bagnall describes how to get more out of some favourite NRICH investigations.

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Eye View

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Why does the tower look a different size in each of these pictures?

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Folded Number Line

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

When I fold a 0-20 number line, I end up with 'stacks' of numbers on top of each other. These challenges involve varying the length of the number line and investigating the 'stack totals'.

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It's a Fence!

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

In this challenge, you will work in a group to investigate circular fences enclosing trees that are planted in square or triangular arrangements.

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Counters in the Middle

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

This task depends on groups working collaboratively, discussing and reasoning to agree a final product.

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More and More Buckets

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

In this challenge, buckets come in five different sizes. If you choose some buckets, can you investigate the different ways in which they can be filled?

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How Random!

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Explore this interactivity and see if you can work out what it does. Could you use it to estimate the area of a shape?

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Spirals, Spirals

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Here are two kinds of spirals for you to explore. What do you notice?

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Stacks of Maths!

Age 5 to 14

In this article for teachers, Bernard gives an example of taking an initial activity and getting questions going that lead to other explorations.

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Using Questioning to Stimulate Mathematical Thinking: Addendum

Age 5 to 14

In the process of working with some groups of teachers on using questions to promote mathematical thinking, the following table was developed. It provides examples of generic questions that can. . . .

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Holywell Primary School and NRICH Action Research Project

Age 5 to 11

This article for teachers outlines one school's research project to explore how children, girls in particular, could be motivated in Maths through a more practical approach.

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Baravelle

Age 7 to 16 Challenge Level:

What can you see? What do you notice? What questions can you ask?

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Stick Images

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

This task requires learners to explain and help others, asking and answering questions.

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Guess the Dominoes for Two

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

Guess the Dominoes for child and adult. Work out which domino your partner has chosen by asking good questions.

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Working Effectively with All Learners

Age 5 to 18

Some questions and prompts to encourage discussion about what experiences you want to give your pupils to help them reach their full potential in mathematics.

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I'm Stuck!

Age 5 to 11

Being stuck is usually thought of as being a negative state of affairs. We want our pupils to succeed, not to struggle. Or do we? This article discusses why being stuck can be fruitful.

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What Shape?

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

This task develops spatial reasoning skills. By framing and asking questions a member of the team has to find out what mathematical object they have chosen.

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Using Questioning to Stimulate Mathematical Thinking

Age 5 to 14

Good questioning techniques have long being regarded as a fundamental tool of effective teachers. This article for teachers looks at different categories of questions that can promote mathematical. . . .

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Placing Our Trust in Learners

Age 5 to 14

In this article Liz Woodham reflects on just how much we really listen to learners’ own questions to determine the mathematical path of lessons.

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What Shape for Two

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

'What Shape?' activity for adult and child. Can you ask good questions so you can work out which shape your partner has chosen?

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Guess the Dominoes

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

This task depends on learners sharing reasoning, listening to opinions, reflecting and pulling ideas together.