Search by Topic

Resources tagged with Investigations similar to Investigating Pascal's Triangle:

Filter by: Content type:
Age range:
Challenge level:

There are 147 results

Broad Topics > Using, Applying and Reasoning about Mathematics > Investigations

problem icon

Investigating Pascal's Triangle

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

In this investigation, we look at Pascal's Triangle in a slightly different way - rotated and with the top line of ones taken off.

problem icon

The Great Tiling Count

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Compare the numbers of particular tiles in one or all of these three designs, inspired by the floor tiles of a church in Cambridge.

problem icon

Pebbles

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

Place four pebbles on the sand in the form of a square. Keep adding as few pebbles as necessary to double the area. How many extra pebbles are added each time?

problem icon

Steps to the Podium

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

It starts quite simple but great opportunities for number discoveries and patterns!

problem icon

Mobile Numbers

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

In this investigation, you are challenged to make mobile phone numbers which are easy to remember. What happens if you make a sequence adding 2 each time?

problem icon

Polygonals

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Polygonal numbers are those that are arranged in shapes as they enlarge. Explore the polygonal numbers drawn here.

problem icon

More Pebbles

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

Have a go at this 3D extension to the Pebbles problem.

problem icon

Tables Without Tens

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Investigate and explain the patterns that you see from recording just the units digits of numbers in the times tables.

problem icon

Sending Cards

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

This challenge asks you to investigate the total number of cards that would be sent if four children send one to all three others. How many would be sent if there were five children? Six?

problem icon

Doplication

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

We can arrange dots in a similar way to the 5 on a dice and they usually sit quite well into a rectangular shape. How many altogether in this 3 by 5? What happens for other sizes?

problem icon

It Was 2010!

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

If the answer's 2010, what could the question be?

problem icon

Number Families

Age 11 to 14 Challenge Level:

How many different sets of numbers with at least four members can you find in the numbers in this box?

problem icon

Sometimes We Lose Things

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Well now, what would happen if we lost all the nines in our number system? Have a go at writing the numbers out in this way and have a look at the multiplications table.

problem icon

Move a Match

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

How can you arrange these 10 matches in four piles so that when you move one match from three of the piles into the fourth, you end up with the same arrangement?

problem icon

Take Ten Sticks

Age 11 to 16 Challenge Level:

Take ten sticks in heaps any way you like. Make a new heap using one from each of the heaps. By repeating that process could the arrangement 7 - 1 - 1 - 1 ever turn up, except by starting with it?

problem icon

28 and It's Upward and Onward

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Can you find ways of joining cubes together so that 28 faces are visible?

problem icon

Abundant Numbers

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

48 is called an abundant number because it is less than the sum of its factors (without itself). Can you find some more abundant numbers?

problem icon

Division Rules

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

This challenge encourages you to explore dividing a three-digit number by a single-digit number.

problem icon

Newspapers

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

When newspaper pages get separated at home we have to try to sort them out and get things in the correct order. How many ways can we arrange these pages so that the numbering may be different?

problem icon

Exploring Wild & Wonderful Number Patterns

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

EWWNP means Exploring Wild and Wonderful Number Patterns Created by Yourself! Investigate what happens if we create number patterns using some simple rules.

problem icon

Chocolate

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

There are three tables in a room with blocks of chocolate on each. Where would be the best place for each child in the class to sit if they came in one at a time?

problem icon

Stairs

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

This challenge is to design different step arrangements, which must go along a distance of 6 on the steps and must end up at 6 high.

problem icon

Follow the Numbers

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

What happens when you add the digits of a number then multiply the result by 2 and you keep doing this? You could try for different numbers and different rules.

problem icon

Round and Round the Circle

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

What happens if you join every second point on this circle? How about every third point? Try with different steps and see if you can predict what will happen.

problem icon

Two Squared

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

What happens to the area of a square if you double the length of the sides? Try the same thing with rectangles, diamonds and other shapes. How do the four smaller ones fit into the larger one?

problem icon

Consecutive Numbers

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

An investigation involving adding and subtracting sets of consecutive numbers. Lots to find out, lots to explore.

problem icon

Triple Cubes

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

This challenge involves eight three-cube models made from interlocking cubes. Investigate different ways of putting the models together then compare your constructions.

problem icon

Calcunos

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

If we had 16 light bars which digital numbers could we make? How will you know you've found them all?

problem icon

Crossing the Town Square

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

This tricky challenge asks you to find ways of going across rectangles, going through exactly ten squares.

problem icon

The Numbers Give the Design

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Make new patterns from simple turning instructions. You can have a go using pencil and paper or with a floor robot.

problem icon

Taking a Die for a Walk

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

Investigate the numbers that come up on a die as you roll it in the direction of north, south, east and west, without going over the path it's already made.

problem icon

It's All about 64

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Write the numbers up to 64 in an interesting way so that the shape they make at the end is interesting, different, more exciting ... than just a square.

problem icon

Sorting the Numbers

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

Complete these two jigsaws then put one on top of the other. What happens when you add the 'touching' numbers? What happens when you change the position of the jigsaws?

problem icon

Street Sequences

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

Investigate what happens when you add house numbers along a street in different ways.

problem icon

It's Times Again

Age 7 to 14 Challenge Level:

Numbers arranged in a square but some exceptional spatial awareness probably needed.

problem icon

Street Party

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

The challenge here is to find as many routes as you can for a fence to go so that this town is divided up into two halves, each with 8 blocks.

problem icon

Teddy Town

Age 5 to 14 Challenge Level:

There are nine teddies in Teddy Town - three red, three blue and three yellow. There are also nine houses, three of each colour. Can you put them on the map of Teddy Town according to the rules?

problem icon

Stacks of Maths!

Age 5 to 14

In this article for teachers, Bernard gives an example of taking an initial activity and getting questions going that lead to other explorations.

problem icon

Month Mania

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

Can you design a new shape for the twenty-eight squares and arrange the numbers in a logical way? What patterns do you notice?

problem icon

3 Rings

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

If you have three circular objects, you could arrange them so that they are separate, touching, overlapping or inside each other. Can you investigate all the different possibilities?

problem icon

Ice Cream

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

You cannot choose a selection of ice cream flavours that includes totally what someone has already chosen. Have a go and find all the different ways in which seven children can have ice cream.

problem icon

Triangle Pin-down

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Use the interactivity to investigate what kinds of triangles can be drawn on peg boards with different numbers of pegs.

problem icon

Halloween Investigation

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Ana and Ross looked in a trunk in the attic. They found old cloaks and gowns, hats and masks. How many possible costumes could they make?

problem icon

Birds in the Garden

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

This activity asks you to collect information about the birds you see in the garden. Are there patterns in the data or do the birds seem to visit randomly?

problem icon

Lost Books

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

While we were sorting some papers we found 3 strange sheets which seemed to come from small books but there were page numbers at the foot of each page. Did the pages come from the same book?

problem icon

Little Boxes

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

How many different cuboids can you make when you use four CDs or DVDs? How about using five, then six?

problem icon

Sticky Triangles

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

Can you continue this pattern of triangles and begin to predict how many sticks are used for each new "layer"?

problem icon

Magic Constants

Age 7 to 11 Challenge Level:

In a Magic Square all the rows, columns and diagonals add to the 'Magic Constant'. How would you change the magic constant of this square?

problem icon

Squareo'scope Determines the Kind of Triangle

Age 11 to 14

A description of some experiments in which you can make discoveries about triangles.

problem icon

Number Squares

Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level:

Start with four numbers at the corners of a square and put the total of two corners in the middle of that side. Keep going... Can you estimate what the size of the last four numbers will be?