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Resources tagged with Trigonometric identities similar to Trigger:

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Broad Topics > Pythagoras and Trigonometry > Trigonometric identities

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Loch Ness

Age 16 to 18 Challenge Level:

Draw graphs of the sine and modulus functions and explain the humps.

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Trig Reps

Age 16 to 18 Challenge Level:

Can you deduce the familiar properties of the sine and cosine functions starting from these three different mathematical representations?

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Octa-flower

Age 16 to 18 Challenge Level:

Join some regular octahedra, face touching face and one vertex of each meeting at a point. How many octahedra can you fit around this point?

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Sine and Cosine for Connected Angles

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

The length AM can be calculated using trigonometry in two different ways. Create this pair of equivalent calculations for different peg boards, notice a general result, and account for it.

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Round and Round a Circle

Age 14 to 16 Challenge Level:

Can you explain what is happening and account for the values being displayed?

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Reflect Again

Age 16 to 18 Challenge Level:

Follow hints to investigate the matrix which gives a reflection of the plane in the line y=tanx. Show that the combination of two reflections in intersecting lines is a rotation.

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T for Tan

Age 16 to 18 Challenge Level:

Can you find a way to prove the trig identities using a diagram?

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Shape and Territory

Age 16 to 18 Challenge Level:

If for any triangle ABC tan(A - B) + tan(B - C) + tan(C - A) = 0 what can you say about the triangle?

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Quaternions and Reflections

Age 16 to 18 Challenge Level:

See how 4 dimensional quaternions involve vectors in 3-space and how the quaternion function F(v) = nvn gives a simple algebraic method of working with reflections in planes in 3-space.

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Why Stop at Three by One

Age 16 to 18

Beautiful mathematics. Two 18 year old students gave eight different proofs of one result then generalised it from the 3 by 1 case to the n by 1 case and proved the general result.

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Quaternions and Rotations

Age 16 to 18 Challenge Level:

Find out how the quaternion function G(v) = qvq^-1 gives a simple algebraic method for working with rotations in 3-space.

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Polar Flower

Age 16 to 18 Challenge Level:

This polar equation is a quadratic. Plot the graph given by each factor to draw the flower.

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An Introduction to Complex Numbers

Age 16 to 18

A short introduction to complex numbers written primarily for students aged 14 to 19.

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What Are Complex Numbers?

Age 16 to 18

This article introduces complex numbers, brings together into one bigger 'picture' some closely related elementary ideas like vectors and the exponential and trigonometric functions and. . . .