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Resources tagged with Sequences similar to Double Trouble:

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Challenge level: Challenge Level:1 Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:3

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Broad Topics > Sequences, Functions and Graphs > Sequences

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Double Trouble

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Simple additions can lead to intriguing results...

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Triangles Within Pentagons

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Show that all pentagonal numbers are one third of a triangular number.

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Triangles Within Triangles

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Can you find a rule which connects consecutive triangular numbers?

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Changing Places

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Place a red counter in the top left corner of a 4x4 array, which is covered by 14 other smaller counters, leaving a gap in the bottom right hand corner (HOME). What is the smallest number of moves. . . .

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Triangles Within Squares

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Can you find a rule which relates triangular numbers to square numbers?

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Sums of Powers - A Festive Story

Stage: 3 and 4

A story for students about adding powers of integers - with a festive twist.

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A Number Sequences Resource

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

This resource contains interactive problems to support work on number sequences at Key Stage 4.

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Series Sums

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Let S1 = 1 , S2 = 2 + 3, S3 = 4 + 5 + 6 ,........ Calculate S17.

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Summing Squares

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Discover a way to sum square numbers by building cuboids from small cubes. Can you picture how the sequence will grow?

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Seven Squares

Stage: 3 and 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Watch these videos to see how Phoebe, Alice and Luke chose to draw 7 squares. How would they draw 100?

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Three Frogs

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Three frogs hopped onto the table. A red frog on the left a green in the middle and a blue frog on the right. Then frogs started jumping randomly over any adjacent frog. Is it possible for them to. . . .

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Odds, Evens and More Evens

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Alison, Bernard and Charlie have been exploring sequences of odd and even numbers, which raise some intriguing questions...

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Big Powers

Stage: 3 and 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Three people chose this as a favourite problem. It is the sort of problem that needs thinking time - but once the connection is made it gives access to many similar ideas.

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Charlie's Delightful Machine

Stage: 3 and 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Here is a machine with four coloured lights. Can you develop a strategy to work out the rules controlling each light?

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Logoland - Sequences

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Make some intricate patterns in LOGO

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Clock Squares

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Square numbers can be represented on the seven-clock (representing these numbers modulo 7). This works like the days of the week.

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Happy Numbers

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Take any whole number between 1 and 999, add the squares of the digits to get a new number. Make some conjectures about what happens in general.

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Tiny Nines

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Find the decimal equivalents of the fractions one ninth, one ninety ninth, one nine hundred and ninety ninth etc. Explain the pattern you get and generalise.

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Differs

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Choose any 4 whole numbers and take the difference between consecutive numbers, ending with the difference between the first and the last numbers. What happens when you repeat this process over and. . . .

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More Pebbles

Stage: 2 and 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Have a go at this 3D extension to the Pebbles problem.

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Farey Sequences

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

There are lots of ideas to explore in these sequences of ordered fractions.

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Triangles and Petals

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

An equilateral triangle rotates around regular polygons and produces an outline like a flower. What are the perimeters of the different flowers?

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Power Mad!

Stage: 3 and 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Powers of numbers behave in surprising ways. Take a look at some of these and try to explain why they are true.

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A Little Light Thinking

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Here is a machine with four coloured lights. Can you make two lights switch on at once? Three lights? All four lights?

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Paving Paths

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

How many different ways can I lay 10 paving slabs, each 2 foot by 1 foot, to make a path 2 foot wide and 10 foot long from my back door into my garden, without cutting any of the paving slabs?

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Adding Triangles

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

What is the total area of the first two triangles as a fraction of the original A4 rectangle? What is the total area of the first three triangles as a fraction of the original A4 rectangle? If. . . .

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Seven Squares - Group-worthy Task

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Choose a couple of the sequences. Try to picture how to make the next, and the next, and the next... Can you describe your reasoning?

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LOGO Challenge - Sequences and Pentagrams

Stage: 3, 4 and 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Explore this how this program produces the sequences it does. What are you controlling when you change the values of the variables?

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Intersecting Circles

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Three circles have a maximum of six intersections with each other. What is the maximum number of intersections that a hundred circles could have?

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Odd Differences

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

The diagram illustrates the formula: 1 + 3 + 5 + ... + (2n - 1) = n² Use the diagram to show that any odd number is the difference of two squares.

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Loopy

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Investigate sequences given by $a_n = \frac{1+a_{n-1}}{a_{n-2}}$ for different choices of the first two terms. Make a conjecture about the behaviour of these sequences. Can you prove your conjecture?

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Squaresearch

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Consider numbers of the form un = 1! + 2! + 3! +...+n!. How many such numbers are perfect squares?

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Remainder

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

What is the remainder when 2^2002 is divided by 7? What happens with different powers of 2?

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Sixational

Stage: 4 and 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

The nth term of a sequence is given by the formula n^3 + 11n . Find the first four terms of the sequence given by this formula and the first term of the sequence which is bigger than one million. . . .

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Shifting Times Tables

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Can you find a way to identify times tables after they have been shifted up?

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Lower Bound

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

What would you get if you continued this sequence of fraction sums? 1/2 + 2/1 = 2/3 + 3/2 = 3/4 + 4/3 =

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Sissa's Reward

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Sissa cleverly asked the King for a reward that sounded quite modest but turned out to be rather large...

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Towers

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

A tower of squares is built inside a right angled isosceles triangle. The largest square stands on the hypotenuse. What fraction of the area of the triangle is covered by the series of squares?

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1 Step 2 Step

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Liam's house has a staircase with 12 steps. He can go down the steps one at a time or two at time. In how many different ways can Liam go down the 12 steps?

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Triangular Triples

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Show that 8778, 10296 and 13530 are three triangular numbers and that they form a Pythagorean triple.

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On the Importance of Pedantry

Stage: 3, 4 and 5

A introduction to how patterns can be deceiving, and what is and is not a proof.

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Converging Means

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Take any two positive numbers. Calculate the arithmetic and geometric means. Repeat the calculations to generate a sequence of arithmetic means and geometric means. Make a note of what happens to the. . . .

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Designing Table Mats

Stage: 3 and 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Formulate and investigate a simple mathematical model for the design of a table mat.

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Extending Great Squares

Stage: 2 and 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Explore one of these five pictures.

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What an Odd Fact(or)

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Can you show that 1^99 + 2^99 + 3^99 + 4^99 + 5^99 is divisible by 5?

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LOGO Challenge - Circles as Bugs

Stage: 3 and 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Here are some circle bugs to try to replicate with some elegant programming, plus some sequences generated elegantly in LOGO.

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Ordered Sums

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Let a(n) be the number of ways of expressing the integer n as an ordered sum of 1's and 2's. Let b(n) be the number of ways of expressing n as an ordered sum of integers greater than 1. (i) Calculate. . . .

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Dalmatians

Stage: 4 and 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Investigate the sequences obtained by starting with any positive 2 digit number (10a+b) and repeatedly using the rule 10a+b maps to 10b-a to get the next number in the sequence.

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Two Much

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Explain why the arithmetic sequence 1, 14, 27, 40, ... contains many terms of the form 222...2 where only the digit 2 appears.

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Generating Number Patterns: an Email Conversation

Stage: 2, 3 and 4

This article for teachers describes the exchanges on an email talk list about ideas for an investigation which has the sum of the squares as its solution.