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Resources tagged with Tangent similar to Farhan's Poor Square:

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Challenge level: Challenge Level:1 Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:3

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Broad Topics > Trigonometry > Tangent

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Muggles Magic

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

You can move the 4 pieces of the jigsaw and fit them into both outlines. Explain what has happened to the missing one unit of area.

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Lying and Cheating

Stage: 3 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Follow the instructions and you can take a rectangle, cut it into 4 pieces, discard two small triangles, put together the remaining two pieces and end up with a rectangle the same size. Try it!

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Perfect Eclipse

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Use trigonometry to determine whether solar eclipses on earth can be perfect.

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Doesn't Add Up

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

In this problem we are faced with an apparently easy area problem, but it has gone horribly wrong! What happened?

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Muggles, Logo and Gradients

Stage: 3, 4 and 5

Logo helps us to understand gradients of lines and why Muggles Magic is not magic but mathematics. See the problem Muggles magic.

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8 Methods for Three by One

Stage: 4 and 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

This problem in geometry has been solved in no less than EIGHT ways by a pair of students. How would you solve it? How many of their solutions can you follow? How are they the same or different?. . . .

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Dodecawhat

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Follow instructions to fold sheets of A4 paper into pentagons and assemble them to form a dodecahedron. Calculate the error in the angle of the not perfectly regular pentagons you make.

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Mediant

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

If you take two tests and get a marks out of a maximum b in the first and c marks out of d in the second, does the mediant (a+c)/(b+d)lie between the results for the two tests separately.