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Resources tagged with Limits similar to Spokes:

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Broad Topics > Pre-Calculus and Calculus > Limits

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Spokes

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Draw three equal line segments in a unit circle to divide the circle into four parts of equal area.

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Resistance

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Find the equation from which to calculate the resistance of an infinite network of resistances.

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Production Equation

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Each week a company produces X units and sells p per cent of its stock. How should the company plan its warehouse space?

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Squareflake

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

A finite area inside and infinite skin! You can paint the interior of this fractal with a small tin of paint but you could never get enough paint to paint the edge.

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Squaring the Circle and Circling the Square

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

If you continue the pattern, can you predict what each of the following areas will be? Try to explain your prediction.

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Witch of Agnesi

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Sketch the members of the family of graphs given by y = a^3/(x^2+a^2) for a=1, 2 and 3.

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Golden Eggs

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Find a connection between the shape of a special ellipse and an infinite string of nested square roots.

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Converging Product

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

In the limit you get the sum of an infinite geometric series. What about an infinite product (1+x)(1+x^2)(1+x^4)... ?

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Discrete Trends

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Find the maximum value of n to the power 1/n and prove that it is a maximum.

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Exponential Trend

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Find all the turning points of y=x^{1/x} for x>0 and decide whether each is a maximum or minimum. Give a sketch of the graph.

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Rain or Shine

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Predict future weather using the probability that tomorrow is wet given today is wet and the probability that tomorrow is wet given that today is dry.

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There's a Limit

Stage: 4 and 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Explore the continued fraction: 2+3/(2+3/(2+3/2+...)) What do you notice when successive terms are taken? What happens to the terms if the fraction goes on indefinitely?

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Fractional Calculus II

Stage: 5

Here explore some ideas of how the definitions and methods of calculus change if you integrate or differentiate n times when n is not a whole number.

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Reciprocal Triangles

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:2 Challenge Level:2

Prove that the sum of the reciprocals of the first n triangular numbers gets closer and closer to 2 as n grows.

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Triangle Incircle Iteration

Stage: 4 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Keep constructing triangles in the incircle of the previous triangle. What happens?

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Golden Fractions

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3 Challenge Level:3

Find the link between a sequence of continued fractions and the ratio of succesive Fibonacci numbers.

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Fractional Calculus I

Stage: 5

You can differentiate and integrate n times but what if n is not a whole number? This generalisation of calculus was introduced and discussed on askNRICH by some school students.

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Fractional Calculus III

Stage: 5

Fractional calculus is a generalisation of ordinary calculus where you can differentiate n times when n is not a whole number.

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Over the Pole

Stage: 5 Challenge Level: Challenge Level:1

Two places are diametrically opposite each other on the same line of latitude. Compare the distances between them travelling along the line of latitude and travelling over the nearest pole.