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'Which List Is Which?' printed from http://nrich.maths.org/

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Alison has been working with some weather data, a collection of average temperatures in Fahrenheit.

Charlie has also been working with data. His data set is a collection of teenagers' weights in kilograms.

They have been collecting samples of 40 data points to analyse. Unfortunately, they forgot to label their samples and can't work out which data come from which set.

Alison knows that set A came from her weather data, and Charlie remembers that set B is one of his weights samples. Can you work out which other lists belong to Alison, and which belong to Charlie?

The lists appear in the table below, and you can download them in a spreadsheet here.

 

A B C D E F
68 53 48 69 52 62
50 60 72 58 51 63
34 56 58 52 73 52
51 54 61 75 64 55
50 48 56 74 51 58
68 65 48 54 49 45
71 59 61 54 42 53
69 54 47 52 54 56
76 58 58 63 53 56
48 57 65 57 47 60
71 60 63 49 74 54
69 57 55 49 73 63
49 60 55 55 48 61
51 53 62 65 58 59
68 60 49 68 53 59
56 58 55 49 55 64
52 60 54 52 56 59
59 58 62 55 50 57
54 61 53 73 78 58
65 56 58 56 46 55
71 58 60 49 67 56
49 58 58 67 71 70
61 57 52 57 70 66
52 67 63 70 52 54
53 54 59 49 69 60
46 65 52 74 43 56
60 57 52 65 45 58
46 64 54 69 64 58
48 58 51 50 51 70
70 57 59 49 64 63
65 48 63 55 58 53
66 61 57 51 85 48
42 58 68 60 70 58
58 59 59 68 46 65
73 51 66 65 60 61
80 62 55 51 53 54
62 64 59 40 70 51
45 60 63 50 56 59
61 57 63 74 47 58
49 47 50 42 64 61

 

GeoGebra, which is free to download and use, includes a spreadsheet tool and can be used to create statistical diagrams that may be helpful for your analysis.