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Rachel from West Flegg Middle School has made decisions about things such as what numbers she wanted to use and what sort of mathematics she used. And she look for patterns! She says:

Hi, I'm Rachel. I am nearly eleven, so I thought I would write about "I'm Eleven''. In my investigation of different ways to find eleven, I will be using addition, subtraction, fractions, decimals and timesing. Some sums will use all and some will use some, but whatever, I will make eleven.

1. (10 + 78) $\div$ 8 = 11   2. (0.8 $\times$ 10) +3 = 11
3. 0.11 $\times$100 = 11   4. ((11/12 of 72) $\div$ 11) +5 = 11
5. 50 - 39 = 11   6. (3 $\times$ 12) - (100 $\div$ 4)= 11

I also, apart from these sums, found 2 sets of patterns. Here they are:

Pattern 1

(4 $\times$3) - 1 = 11
(5 $\times$3) - 4 = 11
(6 $\times$3) - 7 = 11
(7 $\times$3) - 10 = 11








Pattern 2

(4 $\times$11)-(3 $\times$11) = 11
(5 $\times$11)-(4 $\times$11) = 11
(6 $\times$11)-(5 $\times$11) = 11
(7 $\times$11)-(6 $\times$11) = 11








7. (132 $\div$ 10) - 2.2 = 11   8. 52 - 41 = 11
9. (77 $\div$ 11) + 4 = 11   10. (11 $\times$ 11) $\div$ 11= 11
11. 249.15 $\div$ 22.65 = 11   12. 3$^2$ + 2 = 11

In 2015 we had a number of solutions sent in from The Spinney School. 
Here is a glimpse of them, but all the pupils' work can be see in this file Spinney School.doc .

 


Thank you all at the Spinney for your good work and thinking through the whole idea of using what you know to get your total.